Treatments

Facial Aesthetics » Dermaceutic: Types of Peels

i) Mask Peel

Dermaceutic Glycolic Acid (GA) Peels (Mask Peel 30% and Milk Peel 50%)

Peels are an excellent treatment to help improve the texture and appearance of the skin. They can also help to reduce fine lines and improve the elasticity and tone of the skin as well as reduce abnormal pigmentation.

During the procedure most people experience a mild stinging sensation whilst the glycolic acid mask/liquid is on the face. The face is often pink after the solution is removed, and there may be a faintish white discoloration in some areas, or a blotchy appearance to the skin that usually fades within a couple of hours. Some people do not experience any visible peeling off of the skin after treatment, but the treatment still has a beneficial effect, like a very good exfoliation.

Side effects or risks of these superficial peels can be hyperpigmentation (too much pigment which causes brown blotches on the skin) and a high factor sunscreen should be applied at all times to help reduce the potential for this problem.

In rare cases, people may experience an infection in the skin or an out-break of cold sores. This normally only occurs in people who have a history of such complaints. (Anti-viral medication may be recommended if such complications occur.)

The aftercare instructions advised by the practitioner must be strictly followed. In particular, strict sun avoidance and the use of a high factor (30+) UVA and UVB block when outdoors must be complied with for at least 6 weeks to minimise any risk of overpigmented areas developing, triggered by the sun. This also relates to cloudy and dull days when the sun is not visible.

What should you do after a peel procedure?

It is very important that you carefully follow the advice given by the practitioner following a peel treatment to help to improve the benefit of the procedure and reduce the risk of complications or side effects. This includes using all the crèmes as directed and using a high factor sun protection crème every day.

  • Cleansing the face gently with a soap-free cleanser, pat dry with a towel, and moisturise twice a day.
  • Don’t pick off any dead/peeling skin as this may cause bleeding & discoloration, or even mild scarring.
  • Not exposing yourself to the sun without a sunscreen for at least 6 weeks after treatment to reduce the risk of hyperpigmentation (brown blotches on the face) A high factor sunblock should be used daily to protect the skin (even on a dull or cloudy day).
  • If itching is severe during the healing phase, antihistamines may be recommended to help stop this symptom.
  • Avoiding scratching or picking at the skin to reduce the chances of scarring.

Who should not have a chemical peel?

  • If you have a history of problems with keloid scars (raised scars that grow out beyond the original site of injury) or other types of scarring of your skin
  • If you have facial warts or any current facial infection.
  • If you have used the anti-acne treatment isotretinoin (brand name Roaccutane) within the last 12 months.
  • If you have darkly pigmented skin, or red hair with freckled skin. In such cases, you would generally be unsuitable for the deeper peels owing to the potential for skin bleaching. Afro-Caribbean or dark Asian skin is often not suited to facial peels because of the risk of bleaching the skin. This is particularly the case with the deeper peels where the top layers of skin are removed.

Summary of risks from medical skin peels

Peels are a commonly used form of skin rejuvenation and the vast majority are carried out with no complications. However, you do need to be aware of the risks, which can be summarised below:

  • Burning sensation and stinging
  • Redness – can last for a few weeks
  • Peeling – it is important that you do not pick at or peel off the skin
  • Sensitive skin after the peel
  • In rare cases, patients may experience an infection in the skin or an out-break of cold sores. This normally only occurs in patients who have a history of such complaints and anti-viral medication may be recommended if such complications occur.
  • Mild transient swelling of the face
  • Hypo or Hyperpigmentation – patients must use all after care products as directed and remember to use a high factor sunscreen (factor 30 or more)
  • In rare cases scarring or keloids may occur.


Dermaceutic professional products Mask Peel



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ii) Milk Peel

Dermaceutic professional products Milk Peel



iii) Spot Peel

Dermaceutic Spot Peel :Hyperpigmented areas: Sun spots etc. 0n Face and Hands

What should I do after a peel procedure?
It is very important that you carefully follow the advice given by the Doctor following a peel treatment to help to improve the benefit of the procedure and reduce the risk of complications or side effects. This includes using all the crèmes as directed and using a high factor sun protection crème every day.

  • Cleansing the face gently with a soap-free cleanser, pat dry with a towel, and moisturise twice a day. Don’t pick off any dead/peeling skin as this may cause bleeding & discoloration, or even mild scarring.
  • Not exposing yourself to the sun without a sunscreen for at least 6 weeks after treatment to reduce the risk of hyperpigmentation (brown blotches on the face) A high factor sunblock should be used daily to protect the skin (even on a dull or cloudy day).
  • If itching is severe during the healing phase, antihistamines may be recommended to help stop this symptom.
  • Avoiding scratching or picking at the skin to reduce the chances of scarring;
  • Contact the clinic immediately if you notice any signs of infection, scarring or pigment changes.

Who should not have a chemical peel?

  • If you have a history of problems with keloid scars (raised scars that grow out beyond the original site of injury) or other types of scarring of your skin;
  • If you have facial warts or any current facial infection;
  • If you have used the anti-acne treatment isotretinoin (brand name Roaccutane) within the last 12 months;
  • If you have darkly pigmented skin, or red hair with freckled skin. In such cases, you would generally be unsuitable for the deeper peels owing to the potential for skin bleaching. Afro-Caribbean or Asian skin is often not suited to facial peels because of the risk of bleaching the skin. This is particularly the case with the deeper peels where the top layers of skin are removed.

Summary of risks from medical skin peels

Peels are a commonly used form of skin rejuvenation and the vast majority are carried out with no complications. However, you do need to be aware of the risks, which can be summarised below:

  • Burning sensation and stinging
  • Redness – can last for a few weeks
  • Peeling – it is important that you do not pick at or peel off the skin
  • Sensitive skin after the peel
  • In rare cases, patients may experience an infection in the skin or an out-break of cold sores. This normally only occurs in patients who have a history of such complaints and anti-viral medication may be recommended if such complications occur.
  • Mild transient swelling of the face
  • Hypo or Hyperpigmentation – patients must use all after care products as directed and remember to use a high factor sunscreen (factor 30 or more)
  • In rare cases scarring or keloids may occur.


Dermaceutic professional products Spot Peel





  • Simple & Easy to use
  • A peel for every skin type
  • Non/minimal pain
  • Non/minimal client down time
  • No client pre prep necessary
  • Visible result
  • Complimentary skin care range
  • Highly Cost effective

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Spot-Peel Aftercare

0n Day of Treatment:
Wash face with a non-glycolic cleanser after ______ hours. Then apply K-Ceutic cream.

FOLLOWING 3-4 DAYS:

MORNING EVENING
Cleanser C5 Cleanser C5
K-Ceutic K-Ceutic
SunCeutic
MORNING EVENING
Cleanser C5 Cleanser C5
Kceutic (Serum C25 or HyalCeutic if preffered) Light Ceutic
SunCeutic Spot Cream on all the pigmented spots

AFTER 4-5 WEEKS:
Arrange a post-treatment review at the clinic
- Then consider changing Spot Cream to Yellow Cream (to be explainedtheir next visit).

Dermaceutic professional products Spot Peel

  • Simple & Easy to use
  • A peel for every skin type
  • Non/minimal pain
  • Non/minimal client down time
  • No client pre prep necessary
  • Visible result
  • Complimentary skin care range
  • Highly Cost effective

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iv) Cosmo (TCA Peel)

Dermaceutic Cosmo (TCA) Skin Peel (15 % or 18%)

TCA skin peels are a treatment for skin-ageing, photo-aging, over-pigmentation and active acne. The treatment is administered by applying thin coats of a solution on to my skin. This stings somewhat but is relieved by a fan. A post-peel mask (crème) is then applied. Immediately afterwards the treated skin will look red (like sunburn) and this redness will fade over a few hours.

The next day the skin will feel tight and may still have a slight redness. Later that day, or the next, it will become drier and tighter. The skin may also become darker as any areas of overpigmentation dry and come to the surface. On the 3rd or 4th day the skin will start to peel (like the peeling after sunburn).

The peeling must be allowed to occur naturally and no loose areas of skin must be pulled off or there could be a risk of scarring. The post peel crème should be applied as directed. After a further few days the peeling should be completed (and after a couple of weeks the next peel can then be performed, if I am having the full course of treatments).

Adverse effects from TCA skin peel are extremely rare. Remember - loose skin must not be pulled or picked off otherwise there could be a risk of scarring. Cold sores (herpes simplex) around the mouth can be triggered off by the peel in those who have previously suffered from cold sores. You should tell the practitioner if you suffer from cold sores, preventative tablets can be prescribed.

The aftercare instructions advised by the practitioner must be strictly followed. In particular, strict sun avoidance and the use of a high factor (30+) UVA and UVB block when outdoors must be complied with for at least 6 weeks to minimise any risk of overpigmented areas developing, triggered by the sun. This also relates to cloudy and dull days when the sun is not visible.

What should you do after a peel procedure?

It is very important that you carefully follow the advice given by the practitioner following a peel treatment to help to improve the benefit of the procedure and reduce the risk of complications or side effects. This includes using a high factor sun protection crème every day.

  • I am instructed not to wash my face until the day after the peel and then cleanse the face gently with a soap-free cleanser, pat dry with a towel, and moisturise twice a day.
  • Don’t pick off any dead/peeling skin as this may cause bleeding & discoloration, or even mild scarring.
  • Not exposing yourself to the sun without a sunscreen for at least 6 weeks after treatment to reduce the risk of hyperpigmentation (brown blotches on the face) A high factor sunblock should be used daily to protect the skin (even on a dull or cloudy day).
  • If itching is severe during the healing phase, antihistamines may be recommended to help stop this symptom.
  • Avoiding scratching or picking at the skin to reduce the chances of scarring.

Who should not have a chemical peel?

  • If you have a history of problems with keloid scars (raised scars that grow out beyond the original site of injury) or other types of scarring of your skin.
  • If you have facial warts or any current facial infection.
  • If you have used the anti-acne treatment isotretinoin (brand name Roaccutane) within the last 12 months.
  • If you have darkly pigmented skin, or red hair with freckled skin. In such cases, you would generally be unsuitable for the deeper peels owing to the potential for skin bleaching. Afro-Caribbean or dark Asian skin is often not suited to facial peels because of the risk of bleaching the skin. This is particularly the case with the deeper peels where the top layers of skin are removed.

Summary of risks from medical skin peels

Peels are a commonly used form of skin rejuvenation and the vast majority are carried out with no complications. However, you do need to be aware of the risks, which can be summarised below:

  • Burning sensation and stinging
  • Redness – can last for a few weeks.
  • Peeling – it is important that you do not pick at or peel off the skin.
  • Sensitive skin after the peel.
  • In rare cases, patients may experience an infection in the skin or an out-break of cold sores. This normally only occurs in patients who have a history of such complaints and anti-viral medication may be recommended if such complications occur.
  • Mild transient swelling of the face.
  • Hypo or Hyperpigmentation – patients must use all after care products as directed and remember to use a high factor sunscreen (factor 30 or more).
  • In rare cases scarring or keloids may occur.

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